Holder for 12mm diameter LASER-diode module

I have a couple of 12mm diameter 1500mW laser modules and heatsinks, plus a cheap Chinese CNC router. However, fitting the lasers is difficult as the heatsinks don’t fit properly into the spindle motor holder. Also, the laser modules are 5V, whereas my CNC only provides a 12V PWM laser output. So, I designed this 3D printing project to hold the laser module and a small power step-down circuit that would fit properly in place of the spindle motor.

You can download the 3D printing files by clicking here, including the OpenSCAD file for customisation as modules, heatsinks and mounting holes may differ for your laser. Also, it can be modified to add a small fan if necessary, to cool the laser when used continuously for a long time. For anyone interested: the step-down circuit is just a 7805 voltage regulator with a 10uF electrolytic capacitor on the 5V side, because the laser module has its own driver circuitry. You can see it in the photo below. Surprisingly for a simple circuit, it seems to work very well so far with GRBL control, but please use that circuit at your own risk.

Inside the LASER holder

Finally, a couple of construction notes in case they help:

  1. I tied a knot in the cable under the lid for strain relief. As the knot is bigger than the hole in the lid, if the cable is accidentally pulled the knot stops it breaking off the circuit board.
  2. The disc part with cutouts is a spacer that sits on the rim above the laser module. It allowed me to keep the circuit, which I glued onto it, away from the module.
Tagged : / / / / / / / /

Simple CNC fence for manual work

CNC routers are wonderful machines for cutting and shaping wood and other materials but sometimes there’s no choice but to use a router without computer control. For example, when trimming the edges of wood to size, or for using the router as a finisher with sanding drums. When that kind of work is needed I don’t want another machine: rather I want to use my CNC router for occasional manual feeding. To do that a fence is very useful, as it allows pieces of feedstock to be pushed past the tool/sander in a straight line. Not only can that help ensure edges are kept parallel, but it also allows creation of small mouldings with edge-shaping bits.

This 3D printing project is my attempt at creating a very simple fence system for my cheap Chinese CNC. The fence part simply slides into the groove along the top of the CNC bed, after light sanding to get a good fit that doesn’t wobble. However, for manual feeding we don’t want the fence to be able to move along the bed groove, so a part is included for a simple stop that can be used to prevent that happening. The stop connects to the side of the bed using a winged hold-down nut as shown in the photo below. You can download the 3D printing files by clicking here, including the OpenSCAD file for any adjustments you’d like to make.

The CNC fence in use

Hopefully you won’t mind if I finish with a word of caution. But, using a CNC router for manual feeding of materials brings risks you may not be experienced with. Probably two of the main ones are the dangers of having hands near your tool/cutter (which can be avoided using a proper push/feed stick) and extra dangers of pieces of tools and feedstock breaking and flying away (which can be largely avoided by feeding slowly and wearing sensible clothes and eye protection).

Another rookie error is to feed material with the rotation of the tool, which means it could unexpectedly get pulled through and shoot out like a javelin (I did that on a router table years ago and it’s amazing how fast the expelled material can be). Not only is that dangerous: it can even ruin your work. You may also want to wear ear protection as the sound level will be higher working close to the motor and tool. Basically, please be very careful and don’t take chances using the 3D models provided here 🙂

Tagged : / / / / / / /

A simple LASER extractor project

This is a simple 3D printed design I came up with to extract smoke and fumes on my cheap Chinese CNC machine when LASER cutting. Basically it consists of a small collector to fit under the z-carriage (with a holder to glue onto the collector) and a couple of parts to adapt a PC fan to fit standard plastic hoses. The collector, once glued onto the holder, should fit the bottom of the z-carriage as shown in the photo above. It’s designed to be removable for when the CNC is used for routing. The z-carriage on my CNC seems a common design, so hopefully this should work on many CNC machines. The inlet and outlet parts need to be glued onto a 12V PC cooling-fan like in the photo below.

From the outlet I attached a 32mm plastic aquarium hose, the end of which goes out of a nearby window. Between the inlet and the collector I used a bit of 20mm rubbery plastic plumbing hose. Despite the design not being optimised for aerodynamic properties, it does remove most of the smell of smoke away through the window. It’s not perfect though as draughts can result in smoke not getting sucked away. I got around that by making a shield to go around the front and sides of the laser to help make sure smoke and fumes get into the collector. If you want to print your own you can get the 3D printing files by clicking here, including the OpenSCAD file in case you need to make any changes.

The extractor fan pump with 3D printed parts and hoses

Tagged : / / / / / / / /

Adding a shield to a CNC-mounted LASER module

My LASER is an attachment for my cheap Chinese 1610 CNC router so it isn’t tucked away inside a metal case with a tinted window. That means I have to wear LASER-safety glasses whenever it’s running, which can be annoying if I’ve got other things to do. So I designed this simple 3D printed shield with dark red windows (as the LASER is blue). It comprises a small frame that slips onto the LASER module (with a hole for a screw if needed to stop it sliding down) and a three-sided shield that slides onto the edge of the frame, as shown below.

3D view of the laser shield assembly

After 3D printing the front and two sides need to have dark red plastic glued in: I cut mine from a plastic square photography filter I picked up cheap on eBay. Then those three pieces need gluing together at the front corners to make the shield. If you want to add some rigidity then there’s also a bottom component you can stick below the three sides. The shield is then easily removed for when you want to focus the LASER or for removing cut materials. You can download the 3D printing files from Thingiverse by clicking here, and in case you need to make adjustments that includes the OpenSCAD file. The shield also works well with my LASER extractor project, localising the area it extracts air from, which is one reason why the bottom plate is included in the design.

Tagged : / / / / / / / /

Mounting a GoPro camera on a CNC machine

Sometimes it’s nice to make a video, even a timelapse one, of a project coming to fruition on a CNC machine. Maybe just as a keepsake, or to share, or even to make some educational Maker instructions. So being able to add a GoPro camera, or other camera that uses GoPro mounts, is something you may want. I did anyway, so the project shown above is a simple 3D printed mount that clips onto a 20mm-extrusion on the front frame of my CNC, which can be positioned right in-line with the work-bed centre.

It’s a very simple 3D printing project that doesn’t even need any support material, so shouldn’t be a challenge if you have access to a 3D printer. The files you can download from Thingiverse by clicking here, which include the OpenSCAD file in case you need to customise or adjust it. Once made you use it to fix on a sticky mount base like in the photo, for your camera arm to fit onto. And below is a photo of my GoPro session mounted on my CNC so you can get a better idea of how it works.

A GoPro camera mounted to a CNC frame

Tagged : / / / / / / / / / / / / / /