Finishing wood using Danish Oil

There are many choices for wood to use in CNC projects, and just as many ways to add a surface finish. But, whichever choices you make on materials and finishes the important thing is that we’re trying to bring out the beauty of the wood colour and grain structure. It’s perhaps one of the big joys of working with wood that it can start off looking really quite plain, even dull, but change completely with a little bit of loving care finishing it off. So, I thought I’d write a post about Danish Oil as I find it a very easy and effective way to bring out the traditional look of hardwoods.

A definition of Danish Oil is hard to pin down, as there’s no set recipe, but it’s usually around a third varnish and two thirds oil (click here to read more on Wikipedia). That means it needs to be mixed-well before use and dries hard, so can be used with or without a later clear-coat. It can also be bought with lighter and darker stains mixed in, to help give a variety of finish effects, so is very versatile. Personally I like to use the natural version, which has very little stain in it, to retain the natural beauty of individual bits of wood.

As an example, below is a photo of my routed Mahogany fish before and after finishing. After a light sanding (very important to open up the surface for a good oil finish) it had two coats of Danish Oil applied simply using a bit of cloth to rub it in. Once dry I added some gold enamel paint to the routed grooves to add detail and then the fish was very lightly sanded to remove over-paint and give a smooth finish. That’s all the finishing it had and hopefully you’ll agree that it looks a lot nicer than it did before.

A routed fish with and without finishing

Another example I can give is the photo below of my Walnut Darth Vader head routing project. The image on the left is before finishing and, even though the Walnut already looks good, it was rather plain. To get to the look shown in the right-hand image it had two coats of Danish Oil, and a light sanding when dry, to bring out the grain and the beautiful colours. The gold enamel paint was then added to the grooves, as doing it before the oil can make the gold look duller because of the small amount of stain in the oil (which sometimes can be a nice effect, but not for this project). I then gave it three coats of Plasti-Kote spray on clear-coat as I wanted a shiny finish. Then, a couple of red Swarovski crystals added a bit of sparkly bling to the eyes.

A Darth Vader project with and without finish

Hopefully you’ll have enjoyed seeing the hardwood projects above come to life using simple finishing techniques. If so, perhaps you’ll think Danish Oil something worth trying out on one of your projects too 🙂

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